Emerging Financial Markets and Investment

Assessed Coursework

Coursework Question:
“[I]t is becoming increasingly evident that the term “emerging markets” is less and less helpful. It
should be scrapped, thus freeing us to imagine a more nuanced matrix through which to understand
the world.”

(Financial Times, 4th August, 2015)

Required:
Discuss why commentators, such as the Financial Times, are increasingly arguing that the term
“emerging markets” is obsolete and needs to be replaced or redefined. In addition, describe
alternative methods of classifying markets and evaluate their suitability for global investors.
The coursework assesses the following Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge and Understanding:
(1) How the topic of emerging stock markets has evolved in the finance and investment
literature;
Subject-specific practical and intellectual skills and attributes:
(1) Critically evaluate research in international finance, international financial markets and
international investment;
(2) Synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding
of the theory and practice of international finance, investment and international financial
markets;
(3) Link taught material to articles in the mainstream financial press
Transferable, employability and enterprise skills and attributes:
(1) Manage time effectively to undertake the relevant reading for the module;
(2) Communicate orally and in writing in a clear and concise manner;
(3) Identify, understand and develop arguments

Coursework Guidelines

Format of coursework:
Your work should be presented in the format of an essay with a word length of 1,500 words (+/- 10%)
excluding your list of references, appendices and footnotes. Please indicate your word count on the
front cover.
Submission deadline:
12 noon on Monday 11 th November 2019
You are required to submit your work via Turnitin. Retain a copy of your coursework before you
submit it. Penalties will be applied to essays that are handed in late (see the postgraduate programme
handbook for the university assessment policy).
Referencing:
Provide a list at the end of your essay of all literature referred to in your essay. Your reference list
should be arranged by author, in alphabetical order. There are different ways of listing references,
and it does not matter which style you adopt, but be consistent. For more information and guidance

on accurate referencing, please see: https://www.dundee.ac.uk/library/resources/featured/cite/. You
will be penalised if you do not include the required information in the appropriate format.
Plagiarism:
You must adhere to the university’s rules regarding plagiarism. A useful source of information is:
https://www.dundee.ac.uk/governance/dca/discipline/plagiarism/. All assignments will be checked for
plagiarism using Turnitin. You are required to complete and sign a coursework sheet indicating that
the work is your own and that you are aware of the consequences of plagiarism.
Presentation of your coursework:
You should present your assessed coursework using the following format:
 Font style should be Times New Roman.
 Font size must be 12 point font.
 The report should be double-spaced with standard margins.
 Fully justify the text alignment.
 Please ensure that you spell check the essay according to UK conventions (you may need to
reset your spell-checker if it defaults to US standards).
 Please include all cited sources in an alphabetically-organised list at the end of the report.
Feedback on your coursework:
You will be able to view your coursework grade and feedback through the original submission point on
the module on My Dundee.

Coursework Guidance

Reading:
Do your reading well before the date on which the coursework is due. This will give you the time to
absorb the readings and to think about the issues raised. It will also make it more likely that you will
find the sources you need. An essay which shows limited reading will receive a low mark.
Quotations:
You are generally expected to write in your own words the results of your reading and reflection,
though you may make a short quotation from a reading in order to comment on it. If you do quote from
others’ work then you must use quotation marks, and say where the quotation comes from. It is
dishonest to quote someone else without giving them the credit. Ideas and views of authors whose
work is cited should be acknowledged in the text and a full reference given in the bibliography. An
essay consisting of little more than a series of quotations from others’ work will receive a poor mark
however good an answer it provides to the question.
Structure:
Form and content of an essay are inseparable. Whatever your argument, how you present it is as
important as what you have to say. An essay should not be a list of facts, figures and data. Facts
and/or events may be important, but they do not by themselves analyse the proposition set out in the
title. Arguments must follow on from one another and any analysis of facts, data or views must rest on
a clear explanation of the problems or themes you wish to examine. The reader should be able to
follow your argument effortlessly and have a clear perception of your point of view on the issues you
are discussing. An essay that lacks a clear scheme of approach will be weaker than one that
immediately sets out its aims and intentions and clarifies its methods. The latter engender confidence
that the writer knows what s/he is doing and has something to say. Some essay topics may give the
impression of inviting you to participate in a broad discussion on important issues about which you
feel strongly. Naturally we are happy that you should set your discussion within a broader social
context. However, do not lose sight of the purpose of the essay, which is for you to make arguments
about the set topic. There is no rigid formula for the structure of an essay.
Appendices and Footnotes:
You can use appendices and footnotes for expanding on issues that are important but not central to
your argument. If you have made use of data, then a data appendix listing the sources of all data

must be included and be of sufficient detail that the reader could obtain the same data from the
information in the data appendix alone.
Grammar and syntax:
Make sure that you proof-read your essay for grammar, syntax and spelling mistakes. Use the 'spell-
checking' facility. However, be careful as a mechanical use of spell-checkers and translation software
can easily change the meaning of your text!
Presentation:
Your essay, should be word-processed. Font size 12 with double spacing and full justification must be
used.
Submission:
Retain a copy of your essay before you submit. Please read carefully the coursework submission
details and follow the instructions.