Contemporary Art

Brief for Assignment 1 – Reading Presentations

ARLH 701 – Contemporary Art
Professor Bovino, SCAD-Hong Kong, Fall 2019
Assignment 1 Guidelines

1

This assignment is 20% of your total course grade.
All students take turns leading thought-provoking discussion on a group of selected readings on
contemporary art for a total of eight (8) formal presentations
• Presentations are prepared by reading through a group of assigned texts that students then present
to fellow classmates to lead discussion around particular works of contemporary art and issues in
the field.
• The aim is to practice discussing and critically interpreting contemporary works of art and the
theories that are part of contemporary art discourse.
• The assignment also seeks to engage students in recognizing and analyzing issues, objects and
concepts, employing various methods of inquiry by developing and articulating a critique of
scholarly literature.
• Students will work with formal analysis, correct terminology, an understanding of cultural context
and the utilization of conceptual and theoretical approaches.
• Students give:
o four (4) presentations on artist instructions prepared for the long-running exhibition Do It
conceived by Hans Ulrich Obrist (Type 1 Presentation)
o four (4) presentations on long readings which include artist writings, academic art historical
essays, essays by art writers, and curatorial texts for exhibitions (Type 2 Presentation)
General Guidelines: Reading presentations are assigned in a list provided on Blackboard.
1. Presentations are performed for the class on the dates that assigned readings are listed in the
syllabus. Please refer to both the syllabus and the attached assigned reading list.
2. PowerPoints (PPTs) or PDFs of slide decks must be submitted to Dropbox by all individual
presenters no later than 15 minutes before class begins.
3. Students must put their PDF/PPT on the classroom Desktop 5 minutes before class.
4. The presentation includes slides that are of professional standard (PDF or PPT). They use quality
images that are not pixelated, the slides are consistent in style and use of font, there are no
spelling mistakes, all text is brief and easy to read, and images are captioned following Chicago
Manual of Style Guidelines provided on Blackboard.
5. In your presentation, you are allowed to use notecards, but you may not read your presentation.
Do not present from a piece of paper, a computer, or from your phone.
6. The presentation must be coherent and students must work together on it.
Type 1. Specific Guidelines for Four (4) Presentations of Do It Instructions: Structure and Content
What exactly does a good presentation on a ‘Do It’ ‘instruction’ look like?
• Duration: Each student will present for 10 minutes. Do not be nervous! This is a formal
presentation but it is fun! Do not read your presentation and be aware of time. You will be
stopped when your time is up and it is your responsibility to cover all of the required material
listed below.
• Preparation: Choose to either follow the instruction or respond to the instruction in some
other way. Document how you followed the instructions or be prepared to show us in class.
If you did not follow the instruction, but responded in some other way, be prepared to show
us and to discuss the reasoning behind your response in class. You can choose not to follow
an instruction, but are required to seek a thoughtful response to the instruction.
• Introduction: The presentation begins with the student showing the preparation outlined
above. The student then reads the instruction along with the full name(s) of the author(s) of
the instruction and the title of the instruction. Remind classmates of the theme of the class
listed on the syllabus.
• Artist (author of the instruction): Provide background on the artist who authored the
instruction using electronic resources discussed in class (i.e., Oxford Art Online, the artist’s
website, the artist’s gallery, museum websites, websites of arts organizations, Ubuweb,

ARLH 701 – Contemporary Art
Professor Bovino, SCAD-Hong Kong, Fall 2019
Brief for Assignment 1 – Reading Presentations

ARLH 701 – Contemporary Art
Professor Bovino, SCAD-Hong Kong, Fall 2019
Assignment 1 Guidelines

2
Ocula or articles about the artist in art magazines accessible online). that will help the class
better understand the reading (note: not schooling or awards). Use electronic resources
discussed in class to conduct research on the author. Include the name of the author, the title
of the reading and the year the reading was written on one presentation slide.
• Key works: Include images of four art works/projects created by the artist in your
presentation. Caption the images following the Chicago/Turabian guidelines provided on
Blackboard. During your presentation, conduct visual analysis of the works/projects using the
checklist provided on Blackboard.
• Cultural Context: What cultural context(s) is this artist operating in? What historical period
and what geographical regions? What political and/or religious issues are relevant? Include
information in response to these questions on one presentation slide.
• Key Concepts from the Theme of the Class: Briefly explain why you think this instruction is
relevant to the class theme and its key concepts listed on the syllabus.
• Contemporary?: If the ‘contemporary’ is not just a term of periodization related to a
particular historical moment, but identifies a particular way of practicing art, or a particular
way art moves us, what about this instruction do you think makes it ‘contemporary.’ We will
mull over this question over the course of the quarter, so don’t be intimidated by it!
• Questions: Encourage classmates to respond to the instruction. Come up with a question to
ask classmates at the end of the presentation. Stimulate classmates to respond, whether by
giving examples or attempting to answer the question yourself. At least three classmates
must respond before the presentation ends. Questions and subsequent discussion are not
factored into the allotted presentation time. Include the question on your slides.
• Works Cited and Captions: Cite any additional sources you used outside of the course
reading. Do not cite Wikipedia. Make sure that your citations, included on a presentation
slide, follow the Chicago/Turabian guidelines provided on Blackboard.
• Interruptions: Do not get flustered when interrupted and asked questions by the professor or
by fellow classmates. Support your classmates if they get asked a question during their
presentation. To avoid interruptions, define any vocabulary or key terms that are not common
knowledge.
• Reminder: You do this presentation four (4) times over the course of the quarter so you have
many opportunities to practice!

Type 2. Specific Guidelines for Three (3) Presentations on Long Readings: Structure and Content
What exactly does a good presentation of long readings look like?
• Number of texts: if you have more than one text, you should be reading them together and
should tell us about all the authors, but still stick to the base number of key terms, key works
and quotes required.
• Duration: Each student will present for 10 minutes. Though this is a formal presentation, do
not read your presentation. Do not go over time. You will be stopped when your time is up
and it is your responsibility to cover all of the required material in that time.
• Introduction: The presentation begins with the student briefly identifying the full name(s) of
the author(s) of the assigned reading(s) and their topics. Each student then discusses one
relevant aspect of the background of the author(s) that will help the class understand the
reading (note: not schooling or awards). Use electronic resources discussed in class to
conduct research (i.e., Oxford Art Online, SCAD Library Databases, E-Flux, Ubuweb, Ocula,
online art magazines, author’s website, etc.).
• Key works: Include images of four art works/projects either from the readings or associated
with artists related to the reading. Caption the images following the Chicago/Turabian
guidelines provided on Blackboard. During your presentation, conduct visual analysis of the
works/projects using the checklist provided on Blackboard.

ARLH 701 – Contemporary Art
Professor Bovino, SCAD-Hong Kong, Fall 2019
Brief for Assignment 1 – Reading Presentations

ARLH 701 – Contemporary Art
Professor Bovino, SCAD-Hong Kong, Fall 2019
Assignment 1 Guidelines

3
• Main question: Identify the main question that you think the reading(s) were exploring. If you
had more than one reading, compare how both readings approached this question or discuss
if the questions posed were very different.
Cultural Context: What cultural context(s) are addressed in the reading(s)? If no cultural
context(s) are directly addressed, what cultural context(s) do you think produced the reading?
What historical period(s) and what geographical regions? What political and/or religious
issues? How do you think this cultural context affects the discussion? How do the works you
selected show this? If you had more than one reading, compare their cultural contexts if they
are different.
• Key concepts: Identify and define two key concepts important to the reading. It is preferable
that they are concepts discussed explicitly in the reading by the author. A ‘key term’ is
different from general vocabulary. Include the key concept and definitions on your slides.
• Quotes: Select one quote from the reading(s) and discuss it in relation to the works you
discussed.
• Reflection: Show us an image of your own work or a work that you have strong feelings
about. Reflect on how what you read about relates to your own work or the kind of work you
are interested in.
• Works Cited and Captions: Cite any additional sources you used outside of the course
reading. Do not cite Wikipedia. Make sure that your citations follow the Chicago/Turabian
guidelines provided on Blackboard.
• Interruptions: Do not get flustered when interrupted and asked questions by the professor.
Support your group mates if they get asked a question. To avoid interruptions, define any
vocabulary or key terms that are not common knowledge.

See the attached assigned reading list for the dates of your presentations. Please note: it is general
policy that presentations cannot be made-up except in the case of an emergency. Missing presentations will
negatively impact your final grade. Check the dates of your presentations and schedule them into your
calendar.

 

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