Human Rights–Concepts and Applications

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Human Rights–Concepts and Applications

The modern system of global governance is highly fragmented among various conflicting regimes resulting in an imbalance between the obligation of states on trade agreements on one hand and human rights treaties on the other hand. The Luo and Maasai people of Kenya give a good example of cultural differences in ethical norms and codes of conduct that might affect the perceptions of public administrators of human rights. One of the violations of human rights identified by the international human rights laws is female genital mutilation (FGM) which is practiced by some communities (such as Maasai) in Kenya while it is not practiced in others (such as Luo) (Muchene, Mageto & Cheptum, 2018). The differences in culture give rise to a dilemma on how should public administrators address the issue because it is regarded as a good tradition in one community and prohibited in another. In 1999, the Ministry of Health prepared an action plan to fight female genital mutilation and it was established that majority of Maasai girls and women are subjected to the practice. Although the practice is prohibited under the Kenyan law, it is secretly practiced among the Maasai community (Towett, Oino & Matere, 2014). Therefore, public administrators in the country may develop a perception that the practice is legal because it is widely accepted in the Maasai community and hence they may face challenges in ending the practice.

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Human Rights–Concepts and Applications

Title
Human Rights–Concepts and Applications
Subject Area
Art
Additional Instructions?
week 8 – ethics
Following the atrocities of World War II, world leaders created a legally binding declaration that would act as the foundation of international human rights law. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, drafted by committee members from several continents, represents “the universal recognition that basic rights and fundamental freedoms are inherent to all human beings . . . [w]hatever our nationality, place of residence, gender, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status” (United Nations, n.d.-a, para. 2). The leaders recognized that these rights are “inalienable and equally applicable to everyone and that every one of us is born free and equal in dignity and rights” (United Nations, n.d.-a, para. 2). Although the United Nations declared these rights to apply to everyone, individuals from various cultures differ in terms of ethical norms, codes of conduct, and values. How do these cultural differences in ethical norms and codes of conduct affect public administrators’ perceptions of human rights?

Human Rights–Concepts and Applications

For this Discussion, select two cultures within one country (e.g., Basques and Romani people of Spain).

Post an explanation of how the cultural differences in the ethical norms and codes of conduct in your chosen countries might affect a public administrator’s perception of human rights within that country. Then, explain how both global governance structures and nongovernmental organizations might address these differences in ethical norms and values in order to improve human rights in that country.

Expand on your postings with additional insight on how ethical norms and codes of conduct within different cultures might affect public administrators’ perceptions of human rights.
Suggest another example of different cultures with different norms and values

Required Readings
Benjamin, D. O. (2010). Rethinking nonintervention: The challenge of the UN charter and protecting the dispossessed. Public Integrity, 12(3), 201–218.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases. Human Rights–Concepts and Applications.

De Schutter, O. (2012). The role of human rights in shaping international regulatory regimes. Social Research, 79(4), 785–818.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Glazer, S. (2004). Stopping genocide. CQ Researcher, 14(29), 685–708.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Twiss, S. B. (2011). Global ethics and human rights: A reflection. Journal of Religious Ethics, 39(2), 204–222.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

United Nations. (n.d-b). The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Retrieved November 19, 2013, from http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html

 

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