LOCAL TO GLOBAL: SUNSHINE SUPER HUB

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LOCAL TO GLOBAL

How can the future development of the Sunshine Super Hub create economic, socio-cultural, environmental, urban form/design/aesthetic and governance ‘uplift’?

Australian cities have experienced a sustained period of urban growth with a significant infrastructural and design growth that has significant impact on economic, socio-cultural, governance, environmental, and aesthetic growth. McDougall and Maharaj (2011) argue that urban growth plays an important role in accommodating growth in metropolitan areas. Indeed when the growth of Sunshine Super Hub is measured by the reasons for visiting the city as indicated in the surveys, it is clear that 38.28% of the respondents visited the city for reasons such as shopping, visiting friends, and for services, 25.62% lived there, 21.51% worked there, and 6.53% studied there (see Fig 1). Therefore, future developments in areas such as health and education would increase employment and hence economic growth of the residents. Additionally development in areas such as retail business (malls) would increase the economic value because 32.71% of respondents in a survey regarded the city as good for shopping (see Fig 3).

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LOCAL TO GLOBAL: SUNSHINE SUPER HUB
SV2 & Assignment 2: Vision Paper, 1,500 words, 
 
The focus/question for this essay: How can the future development of the Sunshine Super Hub create economic, socio-cultural, environmental, urban form/design/aesthetic and governance ‘uplift’? What is the community/planners’ vision for the future Super Hub? What opportunities and what threats exist to that vision? Neighbourhoods are part of a larger metropolis, and planners have an influence on individual and community health and liveability outcomes in a city. As metropolitan Melbourne grows, there are ongoing debates about densification/sprawl, car dependence/active travel, social inclusion/isolation, growth/sustainability and a myriad of other tensions. Different people will hold different values and aspirations for the future Melbourne.
 
In this essay, you are expected to weave the survey data, class/panels, readings and other sources into a compelling and evidenced vision for the Sunshine Super Hub. You should use the five themes as a way to frame the vision. You will also analyse the opportunities and threats to that vision. Once again, illustrations (maps, photos, sketches) are encouraged, you must refer to at least three readings in your essay. You may wish, again, to focus your analysis on one theme as related to the vision but please make reference, even if briefly, to the other themes. The essay should be handed in online and this second essay will be assessed on the same criteria as the first essay. LOCAL TO GLOBAL: SUNSHINE SUPER HUB.
 
The essay will be assessed on: • CLARITY: You present a strong argument and express a convincing opinion on planning • Linking to readings, fieldwork, and presentations: your ability to link in (or contrast) your opinions with the scholarly (readings) and practical (planning report) literature, the fieldwork, and class presentations. • Analysis rather than mere description: what is good and bad about these places? How could planners do better? Detail is MUCH better than trying to cover everything. LOCAL TO GLOBAL: SUNSHINE SUPER HUB.
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LOCAL TO GLOBAL

How can the future development of the Sunshine Super Hub create economic, socio-cultural, environmental, urban form/design/aesthetic and governance ‘uplift’?

Australian cities have experienced a sustained period of urban growth with a significant infrastructural and design growth that has significant impact on economic, socio-cultural, governance, environmental, and aesthetic growth. McDougall and Maharaj (2011) argue that urban growth plays an important role in accommodating growth in metropolitan areas. Indeed when the growth of Sunshine Super Hub is measured by the reasons for visiting the city as indicated in the surveys, it is clear that 38.28% of the respondents visited the city for reasons such as shopping, visiting friends, and for services, 25.62% lived there, 21.51% worked there, and 6.53% studied there (see Fig 1). Therefore, future developments in areas such as health and education would increase employment and hence economic growth of the residents. Additionally development in areas such as retail business (malls) would increase the economic value because 32.71% of respondents in a survey regarded the city as good for shopping (see Fig 3)…………

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