More Coal Equals More Poverty

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More Coal Equals More Poverty: Transforming Our World Through Renewable Energy

Introduction

Throughout the literature of environmental management, two running themes of energy management and climate management are found. There is a strong striking relationship between energy and climate which have impacts on poverty management among the local people. Some of the major issues facing developing countries is poverty and inequality. Tackling these issues means ending the era of fossil fuels and supporting renewable energy for all. The development of more coal will drive people to poverty because of its devastating effects on climate change as well as other environmental and health effects such as pollution, loss of land, and health impacts (Akella, Saini & Sharma, 2009). Preponderance of energy- poor households in the developing economies are living outside the reach of the electricity grid and hence coal is emphatically unsuitable to undressing the problems of energy poverty. Energy poverty may occur in both urban and rural areas and may be contributed by lack of modern energy structures or the inability to access the existing energy services. Globally, more than three billion people live in rural areas and majority of the do not have access to modern energy services (Chakravarty & Tavoni, 2013). On the other hand, more than 863 million people living in urban areas reside on informal housing systems where they cannot access or afford modern energy services. Renewables promise to give solutions to bringing sustainable electricity to the households living without it and bringing transformations for various communities across the world. Renewables include energy sources that are environmentally friendly, naturally replenished on human timescale such as waves, sunlight and heat, wind, geothermal heat, tides, and rain (Zahd & Kimber, 2009). Increasing and improving renewable energy accessibility can improve the livelihoods of billions of people in different ways such as increasing productivity hours and provision of environmental health which are resilient to poverty eradication. Therefore, energy poverty in this essay is regarded not only as a development issue but also an environmental issue which has striking relation to climate change and poverty.

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More Coal Equals More Poverty: Transforming Our World Through Renewable Energy

Ecological modernisation, environmental justice, risk society and ecofeminism all provide
environmental sociologists with theoretical explanations for understanding the processes of
social change that underpin environmental crises, their potential solutions, and the prospects
for sustainability.

Choose 1 of these theoretical approaches to apply to a case study of an environmental
issue, selected from the topics provided for tutorials in weeks 6 -11 (just one topic
required). This should be a different topic from that of your group presentation.

Apply your chosen theory to :

Critically analyse the social and environmental causes and consequences associated with the
issue; and

Evaluate the types of solutions on offer and their merits in terms of achieving sustainability.

Your essay needs to be sociological! Key themes in your sociological analysis might include:
relationships between production and consumption, structure and agency, power
and inequality, gender, technology, nature-society relationships, winners and losers,
meanings of sustainability. More Coal Equals More Poverty: Transforming Our World Through Renewable Energy.

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More Coal Equals More Poverty: Transforming Our World Through Renewable Energy

Introduction

Throughout the literature of environmental management, two running themes of energy management and climate management are found. There is a strong striking relationship between energy and climate which have impacts on poverty management among the local people. Some of the major issues facing developing countries is poverty and inequality. Tackling these issues means ending the era of fossil fuels and supporting renewable energy for all. The development of more coal will drive people to poverty because of its devastating effects on climate change as well as other environmental and health effects such as pollution, loss of land, and health impacts (Akella, Saini & Sharma, 2009). Preponderance of energy- poor households in the developing economies are living outside the reach of the electricity grid and hence coal is emphatically unsuitable to undressing the problems of energy poverty. Energy poverty may occur in both urban and rural areas and may be contributed by lack of modern energy structures or the inability to access the existing energy services. Globally, more than three billion people live in rural areas and majority of the do not have access to modern energy services (Chakravarty & Tavoni, 2013). On the other hand, more than 863 million people living in urban areas reside on informal housing systems where they cannot access or afford modern energy services. Renewables promise to give solutions to bringing sustainable electricity to the households living without it and bringing transformations for various communities across the world……….

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