Reflective Journal

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Reflective Journal
Week 1

This week we have read three resources that have major impact on my understanding of
this unit. Watson (2004) explores the decay in public language while Newsom and Haynes
(2013) explore the form and style in public relations writing. In addition, the short essay by
George Orwell about eh politics and English language further helped me to understand this
week’s reading. I think Watson argument about the decay in public language gives a new
perspective about the reality on the ground where public language is no longer considered an
important part of the social culture. Public language plays a critical role in the society because it
defines the acceptable medium of communication. In addition, Orwell argues that language can
be used as an instrument of concealing or preventing thoughts. This means that language should
be used in such a way that it is clear for everyone and in such a way that everyone understands
what is being communicated. For example, when speaking about political issues, the language
used should be directly referring to the issues that one wants to communicate rather than using
words that conceal the information communicated. Language should be used as a medium
through which people understand each other rather than misunderstand each other.

Category:

Description

WEEK 1
Reflective journal (200-300 words) (this is for assessment)
1) What do you think about Watson’s arguments about the decay of public
language? This ‘death of language’ idea may be something you had not
considered before. What is your own perspective on the role of public
language in society? Do you think it is important? In class we will consider
some recent examples of the decay of language that Watson is speaking of.
2) In his essay Politics and the English Language, George Orwell advocates
language as “an instrument for expressing and not for concealing or
preventing thought”. Can you offer some examples in your reflection of how
language can be used to conceal or prevent thought?

2
1) In this week’s reading by Miller (1992), take a look at the sample essay
written by Karen Rivedal for a university newspaper in the United States (pp.
7-11). Karen’s original essay is critiqued by the book’s author, who shares his
criticisms with her, and she revises the essay. Read Miller’s comments about
the flaws in Karen’s arguments. Reflect on why you think the revised essay is
more persuasive or not (50-100 words)
2) In the Smith chapter – ‘The Writing Process’ – what do you think about the
author’s comments on creativity? How confident do you feel about tapping
into your creativity as a writer? Do you believe it is something that you can
learn, as Smith argues? Do you think creativity really fits with being a strategic
communicator? (150-200 words)
3) After reading the article by Sanderson and colleagues about #AskJameis,
list the most valuable points about understanding and engaging audiences
that you take away from this article. Write these points in your reflective
journal and bring them to your tutorial, for discussion. (Minimum of 3 key
points)
3
This activity is designed to help you bring together some of the key concepts
from the three readings this week.  First, do the readings for this week.
Then read the below articles about the US President’s announcement to
recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Reflect on how you think both
stories frame the issue.
Identify any distinctions or similarities you see – and consider what values are
being invoked, or what values are made salient. Reflect also on how logos,
pathos, and ethos are (or are not) being applied in these news stories.
350-450 words (or thereabouts).

Here are the articles to read:
From US’s breitbart.com
http://www.breitbart.com/jerusalem/2017/12/06/jerusalem-israel-capital-embassy-trump-white-
house/
From Australia’s abc.net.au: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-07/donald-trump-
recognises-jerusalem-as-israels-capital/9234228
4
Drawing from both of the readings for this week, write about how you plan to
approach your speechwriting task.  It does not matter if you have not chosen
your topic yet.
Which elements to your speech are you more (or less!) confident about tackling
in the planning and writing process? Are there any particular rhetorical
techniques and literary devices mentioned in the readings – and in this week’s
course content – that you would like to integrate into your speech? Why do you
think they could be effective? Give consideration also to the delivery of your
speech. What particular insights from this week’s readings and course content
appeal to you for your speechwriting task? (e.g. the interview with Michael
Balfour’s under ‘Watch’, the Topology videos under ‘Explore’)
300-400 words.
5
This week's tasks consist of reflective journal as well as some grammar exercises – see
below.
Reflection:
Read the following (provided in the Readings link):
Chapter 2 – ‘Effective Writing’ from the textbook by Ronald Smith.
Caulley, D. N. (2008). Making Qualitative Research Reports Less Boring: The Techniques of
Writing Creative Nonfiction. Qualitative Inquiry, 14(3), 424-449.
For your reflective journal (a creative writing exercise):
Write a few paragraphs about an important person in your life. It could be a
relative, a friend, a teacher, a boss, or a mentor. In the first couple of
paragraphs, your aim should be to write about them in as matter-of-fact and
objective a style as possible – and in the THIRD PERSON (‘he’, ‘she’); in the
next couple of paragraphs, your aim should be to write about them as
honestly as possible and in the FIRST PERSON (e.g. using ‘I’, ‘we’ etc). After
you have finished these two approaches, write another paragraph reflecting
on what you discovered from trying out these different styles and stances.
(400 words)
Oh, grammar can be so much FUN!!
Who would've thought? Check out this vid about one of my favourite bugbears
… THE APOSTROPHE. After watching this, you'll never get it wrong again!

Why don't you test your knowledge on dangling modifiers here?
How do you fare with subject-verb agreement? Take the challenge here!
Do you ever fragment your sentences? This can really confuse your readers.
Have a go at this Grammar Bytes activity to help you identify fragments in short
passages that just don't work!

6

Read the Allagui & Breslow (2016) article listed under this week's readings.
What are some key points about effective use of social media that you take
away from the Allagui & Breslow (2016) article?  How might this be useful for
you in your public relations practice? Finally, reflect on a social media
campaign you’ve encountered that has used a similar approach to any of the
case studies from the reading – or, in contrast – one that you think was
appalling.  300 words.

7
1) Read the proposal about charity organisation Forget Me Not, which you’ll
see under the ‘Do’ section of this week’s course content. Imagine you are
planning to send this out to prospective sponsors. Then, prepare a one to
one-and-a-half page letter to the CEO of a commercial organisation that you
think could be well-aligned with the Forget Me Not project as a major sponsor
(you decide which organisation would best).
2) Here is the Forget Me Not Partnership Opportunity.pdf
that your letter will support.

WEEK 8
Reflection activities:
1) Read Aisha Durham’s article, ‘Analog girl in a digital world’. How are black women in the
United States using social media to challenge dominant narratives in their country, and attempting
to bring about social change? (300 words).
2) Read: https://www.greenpeace.org.au/blog/whats-going-on-with-our-democracy/ What do you
notice about the writing style used in this Greenpeace blog (13 April 2018)? Is there anything in
particular that stands out for you?  Do you think many people would find this blog persuasive?
(200 words)

HERE IS WHAT TO READ
1
Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel.
This week you will be reading Chapter 1 from Don Watson's book 'Death
Sentence', and a short essay by George Orwell. There is a reflection activity
associated with these readings.
2
1) Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation
panel. These relate to your reflective journal activity for this week (described
under 'Do').
2) This link to the Bernstein Crisis Manager newsletter offers an analysis of
the recent video posted by YouTuber, Logan Paul:
https://www.bernsteincrisismanagement.com/bad-apology-good-apology-ft-
youtuber-logan-paul/?utm_source=Crisis+Manager+2-2-
18%3A+The+%23MeToo+Movement&utm_campaign=Crisis+Manager+2-2-
18&utm_medium=email
3) Lecture notes – These are very brief, but you can build upon the info based
on the mini-lecture, video interview, and TEDx talk for this week.
3
1) Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel. This week you
will be reading chapters by Professor Stephen Stockwell (an Adjunct Professor at Griffith) as
well as George Lakoff, a linguist and framing scholar. I've also included Chapter 3 from the
textbook by Ronald Smith.

2) Read this article about Steve Jobs and how he adapted different rhetorical
styles (logos, pathos, ethos) when speaking to different audiences.
4
Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel.
This week you will be reading a guide to speechwriting by Neale & Ely
(2007) and a chapter from the textbook by Ronald Smith:
1) Neale, T. H., & Ely, D. (2007). CRS Report for Congress: Speechwriting in
Perspective: A Brief Guide to Effective and Persuasive Communication.
2) Smith, Ronald. (2017). Becoming a public relations writer (Chapter 18,
'Speechwriting) pp. 372-387.
There will be recommended readings included in your readings list as well –
these will offer further info to help you design, prepare and deliver your
speech.

Martin Luther King: 'I Have a Dream'
This is the very famous 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered by Martin Luther
King, Jr on 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC. You
can listen to the audio on this site – or read the full transcript. Can you pick out
the rhetorical techniques – logos, pathos, ethos – as well as any literary
devices like metaphor, analogy, anecdote, anaphora, repetition – that King is
using throughout this speech? How are these techniques working to persuade
the audience about the importance of civil rights, freedom, and equality in US
society?
5
Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel. This week you
will be reading:
Chapter 2 'Effective Writing' from the Ronald Smith textbook,
'Becoming a Public Relations Writer'.
Caulley, D. N. (2008). Making Qualitative Research Reports Less
Boring: The Techniques of Writing Creative Nonfiction. Qualitative
Inquiry, 14(3), 424-449.
I have added in another recommended reading by Carl Klaus which you may
wish to explore.

6
1)  Allagui, I., & Breslow, H. (2016). Social media for public relations: Lessons
from four effective cases. Public Relations Review, 42(1), 20-30.
2)  Hutchins, A. L., & Tindall, N. T. (2017). New media, new media relations:
Building relationships with bloggers, citizen journalists and engaged publics.
In A. L. Hutchins & N. T. Tindall (Eds.), Public relations and participatory
culture: Fandom, social media and community engagement. London:
Routledge.

7
Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel. This week you
will be reading:
1) Forsyth, P. (2013). How to write reports and proposals (Revis third;3rd; ed. Vol. 37).
Philadelphia, PA: Kogan Page Limited. (Chapter 2: 'Creating a good report')
2) Newsom, D., & Haynes, J. (2014). Public Relations Writing: Form and Style. Wadsworth,
US: Cengage Learning. (pp. 238-241, Chapter 11: 'Proposals and reports')
3) Chapter 6 of the above book by Forsyth.

8
Find your reading links in the Readings tab in the left hand navigation panel.
This week you will be reading:
Durham, A. (2017). Analog girl in a digital world: Hip hop feminism and media
activism. In V. Pickard & G. Yang (Eds.), Media Activism in the Digital Age
(pp. 205-215). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.

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Reflective Journal
Week 1

This week we have read three resources that have major impact on my understanding of
this unit. Watson (2004) explores the decay in public language while Newsom and Haynes
(2013) explore the form and style in public relations writing. In addition, the short essay by
George Orwell about eh politics and English language further helped me to understand this
week’s reading. I think Watson argument about the decay in public language gives a new
perspective about the reality on the ground where public language is no longer considered an
important part of the social culture. Public language plays a critical role in the society because it
defines the acceptable medium of communication. In addition, Orwell argues that language can
be used as an instrument of concealing or preventing thoughts. This means that language should
be used in such a way that it is clear for everyone and in such a way that everyone understands
what is being communicated. For example, when speaking about political issues, the language
used should be directly referring to the issues that one wants to communicate rather than using
words that conceal the information communicated. Language should be used as a medium
through which people understand each other rather than misunderstand each other…….

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