Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis

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Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis

LOCATION

Seaford is located a few kilometres to the southeast of Melbourne, and its landscape pattern is a beach ridge which is flat with landform elements of the foredune, the tidal creek, and beach (figure1).  Seaford also has a wetland, which is considered critical to the landscape as it protects the area from floods (Cullen, 1973).                                figure 1: Map of Seaford

Today, the site is used by the local as a beach and a tourist attraction site. This study analyses the interactions, processes, and the functions of the landscape at Seaford. The visit had four spots, foredune (spot 1), second dune (spot 2), Kananook Creek (spot 3) and the Seaford (spot 4) Wetland (figure 2).

Category:

Description

Landscape Function Analysis (individual task, 40% of total mark) Tuesday 6 June 2017,
5 p.m. (approx. 1800 words)
In this report, students will demonstrate knowledge and skills gained throughout the subject
through a synthesis of:
(i) relevant content from lectures, practicals and tutorials;
(ii) observations, data and discussions from the site visits and;
(iii) individual research and interpretation of concepts, theories and information that
demonstrate the landscape processes and interactions occurring at their site.
The analyses should also demonstrate the application of different spatial and temporal scales
to the understanding of the landscape functions. The LFA report must be distinct from the
Background Research Report. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
The individual report, of approximately 1800 words1, should be submitted by each student
via the Turnitin link available in the Assignment Submission section of the LMS.
NOTE: Refer to: http://library.unimelb.edu.au/recite/harvard for Harvard Referencing Style.
*Please provide the word count (excluding citations, references, maps, tables, figures etc.) on
the first page of your report.
Suggested report structure: (word count excludes captions to figures, tables and
references):
1. Introduction (approx. 100 words)
Briefly describe the site’s landscape in terms of the main features (e.g. topography, stream
flow and network if any, or water bodies, etc.). Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
• You must use a topographic map (digitally available from
http://services.land.vic.gov.au/maps/interactive.jsp) to describe the landscape.
• You must use a geological map extract to present surface geology of the site.
• Indicate the individual observation points visited on maps and using geographic
coordinates (preferably the Universal Transverse Mercator system)
2. Natural System Processes and Interactions (approx. 1000 words)
(relevant lecture, tutorial and individual research must be incorporated)
• Starting from the geological temporal and spatial scale, discuss the broad-scale
landscape processes that gave rise to the site and place this in the context of the wider
region;
• For the current landscape and present time, analyse the natural processes and
interactions operating at (i) the different locations/observation points within the site,
and (ii) at the site as a whole. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
3. Human-related impacts (approx. 600 words)
(relevant lecture, tutorial and individual research must be incorporated)
• Discuss the impacts of human-induced landscape transformation on the biodiversity
of the site;
• Using diagrams and/or digital tools such as those available in Google Earth,
– evaluate the site’s patch areas, shapes, edge effects, connectivity, fragmentation,
thresholds, etc. and their influences on biodiversity of flora and fauna
– evaluate the site’s connectivity to other patches of natural vegetation and/or water
bodies and their influences on broader regional biodiversity
4. Conclusion (approx. 100 words)
Present your key findings as they relate to the future natural and human amenity of the site
Assessment criteria: Landscape Function Analysis report
Description of a H1-level LFA report Marks
Introduction
(Approx.
100 words)
•The location and surroundings of the site are described clearly
with the aid of appropriate map(s) and/or sketches.
•The key landforms in the landscape are clearly identified,
described and located with the aid of map(s).
•Individual observation sites are indicated using geographic
coordinates (preferably UTM), and with reference to relevant
natural and human landmarks.
•Map(s) from authoritative and credible source(s) have been
used and are presented correctly. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
5
Natural
system
Processes and
Interactions:
(Approx.
1000 words)
•The evolution and development of the landscape is clearly,
correctly and skilfully explained (for example, by integrating
extrusive and intrusive volcanic activity through geological
time, mass wasting processes, fluvial degradation and
aggradation, and soil development) with reference to key site
attributes. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
•The functions of various landscape components are excellently
explained with reference to site attributes and their interactions
(for example, along a meandering river, sandy soils at a point
bar are a function of the water flow regime, and this potentially
gives rise to a certain type of vegetation community).
•Contrasts between different observation points in process and
interaction are clearly and correctly described and explained
with close reference to diagrams, maps, charts, etc. from
authoritative and credible sources.
•A range of spatial and temporal scales1 is used appropriately
throughout the discussion. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
35
Humanrelated
impacts
(Approx.
600 words)
•The different ways in which humans have reshaped the
landscape and impacts on the natural processes (i.e. system) are
clearly and logically explained, and supported where possible
by evidence.
•Human impacts are discussed at the conceptual level using, e.g.
landscape ecology concepts
•A range of spatial and temporal scales1 is used appropriately
throughout the discussion. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
25
Conclusion
(Approx.
100 words)
•The key points of the analysis are skilfully summarized and
synthesized, demonstrating understanding of the site’s
Landscape Functions into the future.
5
Description of a H1-level LFA report Marks
Individual
research and
interpretation
•Information and data from site observations and scientific
literature (i.e. journals and books) are skilfully used to support
the analyses. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
•There is clear and ample evidence of high-quality individual
research and interpretation throughout the report.
•There is minimal copying of content from previous literature.
20
Presentation •Report length of 1800 words including introduction and
conclusion (Note: All citations, references, maps, tables,
figures etc. are not included in word count).
•The content of the report is written at an excellent standard of
academic language. There is no inappropriate use of colloquial
language, opinion or rhetorical devices used primarily in
opinion or editorial writing. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
•The intended ideas are clearly expressed and free from spelling,
grammatical or typographical errors.
•Headings and/or sub-headings are used to clearly organize the
information in the report.
•Where relevant, visual aids such as diagrams, charts, sketches
or maps are used very effectively to communicate ideas,
arguments or evidence.
•All visual aids, including photographs, tables and figures, are
appropriately labelled, acknowledged and discussed in the main
text. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.
10
Referencing
and citation
•The Harvard Referencing System (refer to:
http://library.unimelb.edu.au/recite/harvard), or similar authordate system is used correctly throughout the report.
•All ideas and information (including visual aids such as
diagrams, charts, sketches, maps, photographs, etc.) not by the
student are correctly cited and referenced.
•Reference list is prepared correctly.
(Report will be returned to student for correction if the criteria
for this component are not met, and may be subject to penalties)
Reports containing plagiarized material will be referred for
formal disciplinary action
Pass
TOTAL 100
1Different spatial scales could encompass the micro, local scale (e.g. individual observation sites) to
the broader regional scale (e.g. site area in relation to the surrounding land uses or to other sites);
different temporal scales could range from the daily or monthly to seasonal, annual, decadal or
geological (i.e. millions of years) scales. Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis.

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Seaford Melbourne Landscape Function Analysis

LOCATION

Seaford is located a few kilometres to the southeast of Melbourne, and its landscape pattern is a beach ridge which is flat with landform elements of the foredune, the tidal creek, and beach (figure1).  Seaford also has a wetland, which is considered critical to the landscape as it protects the area from floods (Cullen, 1973).                                figure 1: Map of Seaford

Today, the site is used by the local as a beach and a tourist attraction site. This study analyses the interactions, processes, and the functions of the landscape at Seaford. The visit had four spots, foredune (spot 1), second dune (spot 2), Kananook Creek (spot 3) and the Seaford (spot 4) Wetland (figure 2)……………

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